Oct
23
6:00 PM18:00

Alcatraz, an Unfinished Occupation: Landless in the Bay

With Corrina Gould (Confederated Villages of Lisjan), Ruth Orta (Ohlone/Bay Miwok/Plains Miwok) and Jonathan Cordero (Ramaytush Ohlone)

Three leaders of traditional Bay Area territories will speak from the heart about historical and contemporary events that have left them landless and without federal recognition, the impact of this situation on their people, the work they are doing to reclaim culture and re-assert their claim to these lands, and why Indigenous presence matters as San Francisco emerges as one of the wealthiest cities on the planet and a hub for tech corporations and real estate speculation.

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Nov
6
6:00 PM18:00

Alcatraz, an Unfinished Occupation: The Indigenous Environmental Movement

  • The Exploratorium, Bay Observatory (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

With Mark Tilsen (Oglala Lakota), Isabella Zizi (Northern Cheyenne, Arikara, Muscogee) and Melinda Micco (Seminole Nation of Oklahoma)

Three Indigenous activists will speak to the role of indigenous peoples in protecting water, land and biodiversity in the face of environmental and moral hazards including fossil fuel extraction and climate change.

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Nov
12
6:00 PM18:00

Alcatraz, an Unfinished Occupation: The Indigenous Canoe Movement

  • The California Historical Society (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

With Lehua Kamalu (Native Hawaiian), Frank Brown (Heiltsuk) and L. Frank Manriquez (Tongva-Ajachmem)

A conversation with three Indigenous leaders from across North America rebuilding canoe and maritime traditions in their own communities. Lehua Kamalu, Kanaka Maoli, captained the Hikianalia, a traditional polynesian outrigger canoe on its recent voyage from Hawaii to California. Kamalu is the first woman to captain a traditional polynesian vessel. Frank Brown, Heiltsuk from Bella Bella, British Columbia, organized North America’s first Tribal Canoe Journey to coincide with Expo ‘86 in Vancouver, BC. Brown will talk about his original vision, what it took to launch the first Tribal Canoe Journey, and how the event has taken hold and grown in the 30+ years since. L. Frank Manriquez of the Tongva-Ajachmem is an artist, language activist and leader in the California Indian community. She was the first member of her nation to build and navigate a traditional tii’at in over 100 years and participates in the annual Tribal Canoe Journeys. All will also speak to the challenges and positive impacts of canoe culture on Indigenous communities and the environmental movement.

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Nov
17
2:00 PM14:00

Alcatraz, an Unfinished Occupation: The Occupation of Alcatraz

With Eloy Martinez and Lanada War Jack (Shoshone-Bannock)

A conversation with two original Alcatraz Occupiers about the context in which the Occupation occurred; energy and intent behind the Occupation; immediate impacts of the Occupation on policy, politics and culture in Indian Country; and reasons the Occupation is equally relevant 50 years later.

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Oct
2
to Oct 3

The Politics of Climate Change: A Green New Deal for Canada?

What are the politics and policy of GND discussions elsewhere? What can Canada learn from climate policy in other countries? Speakers: Jonas Nahm, Assistant Professor, Energy, Resources, & Environment, Johns Hopkins University; Julian Brave NoiseCat, Director, Green New Deal Strategy, Data for Progress; Paasha Mahdavi, Assistant Professor, Political Science, University of California, Santa Barbara.

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Nov
19
12:10 PM12:10

Rights and Standing Rock

At the height of the standing rock demonstrations in October 2016, North Dakota state and local law enforcement indefinitely closed the primary road connecting the standing rock reservation to the main public sites in contention. The nine-mile road closure, which lasted five months, prevented access to these sites limiting residents' right to assemble, pray, express themselves, and freely travel.

In October 2018, a lawsuit was filed by affected residents.

Join plaintiffs, activists, and lawyers on November 19 to discuss this important and current case.

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Jun
22
11:00 AM11:00

Climate Politics After the Rapture

The current administration has frozen climate action at the federal level. How can climate and energy politics get through this impasse and toward the acceleration of decarbonization? Two broad camps have emerged, particularly among young advocates: activists and pragmatists. Climate activism focuses on movements like divestment, #ExxonKnew, and the People’s Climate Marches. Climate pragmatism focuses on decarbonization outside of federal mandates, such as state and local efforts, innovation, and clean energy deployment. This panel asks: is the failure to act on climate change a political or economic problem? “Both” isn’t an answer. If climate activists got the political support they wanted, could they achieve deep decarbonization with the current technologies? On the other hand, if the pace of clean energy innovation accelerated with sustained federal opposition to climate action, could the pragmatic plan achieve deep decarbonization?

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Apr
12
6:00 PM18:00

Standing Ground

Uprising 13/13: 13 Forms of Uprising/13 Seminars organized by Bernard Harcourt of Columbia University explores various modalities of uprising, disobedience, inservitude, revolt, or other forms of political contestation. Uprising 12/13: Standing Ground focused on Indigenous politics at Standing Rock and beyond.

 
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Mar
29
6:00 PM18:00

The Struggle for Housing

How are labor issues connected to housing issues? How does labor exploitation ramify in housing exploitation and vice versa? How can we think of struggles for housing, variously considered, as labor issues, and why should we consider them as such? What can labor movements learn from housing movements, and how can we think these movements together?

 
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Mar
3
2:00 PM14:00

Mascots, Myths, Monuments and Memory

Artists and activists discuss the impact of 19th and 20th century racialized symbolism in the 21st century. The conversation will explore a range of responses from removing monuments to systemic racism from view to the renaming of institutions to visually contextualizing the founder of the United States or Confederate War Heroes as the slave-owners they actually were.

 
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Feb
3
6:00 PM18:00

What is decolonisation today?

In recent months, debates about the Rhodes statue on High Street, raised by the Rhodes Must Fall campaign, have prompted broader questions about racism, curriculum change, and 'decolonisation' at Oxford. What has 'decolonisation' meant in the past, what does it mean today, and what should be done (if anything) to decolonise Oxford?

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